_archive for the ‘Illustration’ category

Dan Funderburgh

02/12/09 :: by brocksteady

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Great to see old school (Jayhawk era) friend of mine, Dan Funderburgh featured on QBN today. His work is looking ever so tight — as usual.

Burton + Fudge

11/03/08 :: by brocksteady

My friend Travis Millard just finished an extensive collaboration with Burton for their 2009 product line. They took a playful and bold illustrative approach to their packaging and hang tags, which contrasts well with the techy graphics. Look for some of Travis’ brilliant illustrated details on Burton’s site as well.

Speaking of the next president (and design)…

09/19/08 :: by stina

I can’t recall an election where so many young, creative people were so motivated by and interested in and excited about politics. Or at least a candidate. This isn’t an analysis without variables, mind you… our bff the internet has played a major roll in getting people fired up about a national cause. But still. Let’s look at some non-candidate sponsored items available for purchase today…

It started with the now famous Shepard Fairey illustration, which has since become sort of the unofficial logo of the campaign. (the poster is no longer available, but you can get stickers here).

And turned into this:

Look how many creative, talented people (and this is just a smattering of what’s available) are putting their skills to work to support their candidate for president. Outstanding! I mean, really, the first time that I can remember seeing people actually personally invested in an election.

A search for “obama” on Etsy yields 1486 items. That is some serious support. By contrast, a search for “mccain” only brings up around 300. And most of those are anti-Palin, not pro-McCain. Tell me this is a sign.

This also kind of negates my earlier, disgruntled post regarding the role of designers in affecting change. Eating hat. Now.

WPA posters thanks to FDR and forward-thinking government projects

09/18/08 :: by stina

I was pleasantly reminded of the WPA National Park poster series while perusing Shorpy (thanks to patrick’s tip) this morning. I love the bright, pre-computer graphics and the adventurous, frontier-sy feeling of exploration and, dare I say, majesty they convey.

I can only imagine (enviously) what it must have felt like to tour the country in the late 30’s, stopping at national parks where you legitimately might have been the only car on the road. It’s a lovely thought… and quite a departure from the madness of summertime in Yosemite Valley now.

For those hungry for a little history lesson, the WPA (Works Progress Administration) was part of FDR’s New Deal, instated to put millions of unemployed Americans back to work. A key part of the WPA was the Federal Art Project, whose purpose was to make art accessible and relevant to everyone, not just the elite. As a result these, along with 35,000 other designs, were printed into 2 million posters during the course of the project.

This Travel and Tourism series became well know for it’s bright, bold colors and it’s dramatic portrayal of our famous national parks. As an avid hiker, camper, and visitor to our (mostly western) national parks, I find these particularly beautiful and inspiring.

If only our current government would have the cajones to revive the idea that art can be a positive and motivating influence on the masses. Maybe our next president will… after all he’s already shown an appreciation for art.

Obama-Biden 2008!

Hello Sour Sally!

09/10/08 :: by monika

It’s just sooo cute… You’ll love Sally

Chrome, Anyone?

09/04/08 :: by pwang

The headlines for this week will probably have “Google Chrome” somewhere. Google’s new browser, love it or hate it, is definitely going to change things. Initial likes? The comic, of course, which goes beyond a good marketing/advertising move to something more educational and fun, so you can read it to get caught up with the technical specs on Chrome. I read it and got amped up before installing the app itself. It’s very blue, and there’s no menu bar. Otherwise, it felt like any other, non-IE browser (although the interface at times felt very IE, especially the nav bar). A standout is the new start page, which shows thumbnails of visited sites and used search engines, something I thought smart and useful.

So after using it (not heavily, mind you) for two days, no crashes. Nothing broke. Facebook and all my other web apps worked; even my own site looked right. I’m not keeping my fingers crossed because the app is beta and has bugs. Is it faster? In terms of JavaScript, John Resig says, not really. There is a new task manager-esque feature as well, so windows can be dealt on an individual basis: no more one bad site bringing down an entire browser session. Maybe. I haven’t done anything too crazy to notice a difference, yet. Neither is the new browser a messiah in saving memory, using about 100mb total for keeping open a few web applications, the same as Safari for Windows does. The bottom line: a transparent browser that just (mostly and for me) works, but nothing more than that, yet. The comic was cooler.

But after all this, one question. Why ‘Chrome’ and that logo?

Info-graphics can make you smarter faster

09/03/08 :: by hdunce

Another “I wish I had this when I was young”

sloooooow motiooooon

08/11/08 :: by admin

Subway trains are, since the beginning of graffiti, the most popular way to make your artwork travel. Slinkachu just found a new way to make his graffiti live its own life.

Go Metro Yeaah ! Go Snail !!

Amperwhat ? Esperluquoi ?

08/08/08 :: by admin

The Ampersand, Esperluette in french, aka “&“, is the main character of this blog.

Btw, it leads to some good links, like this one for example.

What is Fez

08/06/08 :: by pwang

It’s a game. A really cool one:

I don’t know the specifics. Like what platform it’s on, or when it’s coming out, or who made it Kokoromi. The gaming industry’s been bland for a long time. I’m glad things like this and the wii can help more of us appreciate the visually different, rather than just things with high production value. Another current (anti)trend in games is low budget. During one session of a gaming class while in my major at UCLA DMA I sat in just to hear Jenova Chen from USC Interactive talk about his work, notably Flow.

With games getting smaller and easier to make for individual creators just as quickly as they are becoming more complex in the commercial industry, I wonder if someday we can all make our own ‘games’ and tailor them to our needs and dreams.